GENDER AND CULTURE IN PICTURE BOOKS

Kay E. Vandergrift

Special Interest Page

Illustration and picture books

Translation

Background readings

Websites

Spanish Language Books

Fractured Fairy Tales

What Is Authentic

World As It Is or Should Be

Ogre Named Oni

An Editorial

Growing Up Chinese

Thoughts On Not Seeing Oneself

Was This Cultural Difference

African-American Experience

Female Protagonists in Picture Books

African-American Positive Images, Part I

African-American Positive Images, Part II

Asian-American Positive Images

Native-American Positive Images

Hispanic-American Positive Images

Islamic Traditions and Culture

Tests

Analysis of a Picture Book

Creation of a Visual Interpretive Analysis

Visual Interpretive Analyses Page

Children's Literature Literacy Test

If we are ever to achieve a culture of inclusiveness that empowers all human beings, we must begin with young people. We cannot control what goes on in individual homes, but we can, and must, actively seek to ensure that our schools and libraries respect the many peoples who share our world, regardless of national origins, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, class, race, or gender. Feminist and multicultural practices can and must make a difference.

All schooling is political. The time has come to ensure that public education represents a politics of inclusion, not exclusion. We ought to respect young learners' abilities to think, speak, read, and act. We should respect their abilities to comprehend, construct, and communicate meanings in various communities and contexts. These need to be the aim, the process, and the result of education.

 

ON ILLUSTRATION AND PICTURE BOOKS

Visual images are powerful means for young children to participate in and make sense of their world. Picture book illustrations make an important contribution to this process. This bibliography contains works both about picture books and the art of illustration.

ON TRANSLATION

If we are ever to truly understand those from cultures other than our own, we must be able to read what they write. Although learning other languages is an important part of global understanding, there will always be a need for skillful and sensitive translations of both informational and aesthetic texts in various languages.

BACKGROUND READINGS IN GENDER AND CULTURE

Much has been written on gender and culture in recent years. This rather extensive bibliography provides a variety of perspectives on those topics.

GENDER AND CULTURE WEBSITES

The world wide web offers opportunities for many voices to be heard. The websites listed here come from a variety of perspectives and, at their best, may stimulate users to think deeply about issues of gender and culture in our society.

THOUGHT CAPSULES

These "Thought Capsules" are brief statements from people who, from their differing personal and professional perspectives, encourage thoughtful consideration of issues related to gender and culture in contemporary society.

Debby Churchman: Who Is Reading Children's Books Published in Spanish?
Hilary Crew: How Feminist Are Fractured Fairy Tales?
Eliza Dresang: What Is Authentic?
Linnea Hendrickson: The World As It Is, Or As It Should Be?
Ariko Kawabata: "Oni," a Kind of Ogre, an Ultimate Symbol of Otherness in Japanese Fairy Tales both Traditional and Literary
Meena G. Khorana: An Editorial
Hur-Li Lee: Growing Up Chinese?
Debbie Reese: Thoughts On Not Seeing Oneself
S. Chris Saad: Was This Cultural Difference?
Karen Patricia Smith: Addressing the Realities of Imaging Within the African-American Experience

 

POWERFUL MULTICULTURAL IMAGES

The bibliographies included here contain samplings of picture books that present positive images of females as well as those representing various cultures.

Female Protagonists in Picture Books
African-American Positive Images, Part I
African-American Positive Images, Part II
Asian-American Positive Images
Native-American Positive Images

Hispanic-American Positive Images

Islamic Traditions and Culture Positive Images

 

TESTING FACTS IN CHILDREN"S LITERATURE

The tests here are self-tests intended entirely for those interested in youth literature to verify their factual knowledge of the field.

 

Created July 9, 1997 and is continuously revised
SCILS, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey