WEBSITES ON THE GOLEM
AND RELATED ISSUES

Kay E. Vandergrift

Special Interest Page

Golem Page

 

This listing of sites is collected to provide additional information and viewpoints on the golem, shadow puppetry, and blood libels. The range and complexity of these sites varies but all should add to both information and understanding.

ALSC Caldecott Award Page The 1997 Caldecott Medal winner is Golem, written and illustrated by David Wisniewski (Clarion Books, a division of Houghton Mifflin).

Cemetary in PragueThe renowned Rabbi Low, the MAHARAL, was buried in this cemetery. His tombstone can be seen in the foreground with the lion's head.

Adam, Golem, Robot - A Dialogue between Ken Goldberg and Ovid Jacob This arose out of a correspondence between Ken and I February 1995. Ken's text is based on a talk he gave at USC Hillel Faculty lunch with Tamara Eskenazi, Professor of Biblical Studies, Hebrew Union College, on 15 February, 1995.

Rava's Golem The following essay appeared in the Summer '96 issue of the Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts written by David M. Honigsberg.

WORLDS OF SHADOW: Teaching with Shadow Puppetry Detailed table of contents on this new Wisniewski book on shadow puppets based on experiences with Clarion Shadow Theatre.

THE PUPPETRY HOME PAGE /PUPPET THEATERS Extensive information of this art form, including pages on definitions, and PUPPETRY TRADITIONS AROUND THE WORLD.

A Hand in LearningThis is the home page for John Patrick Picciano , folk artist, puppeteer and multicultural presenter.

Chinese PuppetryThe origins of Taiwan's shadow puppetry can be traced to the Chaochow school of shadow puppet theater.

The Center for Puppetry Arts Museum Located in Georgia it was established in 1978 with a donation of 150 objects by Nancy Lohman Staub, and its collection and prestige have grown steadily ever since.

The Golem- A study into a Jewish Myth The aim of this piece is to build up a catalogue of different tellings of the Golem tale, background material and a (limited) amount of commentary.

Study Guide for Nosferatu and The Golem Paul Wegener had done a Golem film in 1914 (Der Golem), set at a time later than the events of the 1920 film.] Wegener returns to the creation of the Golem by the [sic] Rabbi Loew and the victorious fight against the Emperor's expulsion of the Jews from the Prague ghetto.

Richard Teitelbaum's Golem Teitelbaum is struck by the parallel with his own attempts to develop an intelligent, interactive artifical "pianist", and also by the golem as a symbol for the promises and dangers of our technological society.

"The Golem" Art by Jean-Marie Bottequin.

"The Golem" Live music by Gary Lucas and Walter Horn Guitarist Gary Lucas and keyboard wizard Walter Horn create science fiction score for fantasy classic "The Golem", which was premiered at the 1989 Next Wave Festival.

THE MAHARAL: The Mystical Philosophy of Rabbi Judah Loew of Prague Table of Contents in this book by Rabbi Ben Zion Bokser, including an excerpt from the book.

Medieval Sourcebook Includes documents of Ephraim of Bonn: The York Massacre 1189-90 and Gregory X: Letter on Jews, (1271-76) -Against the Blood Libel.

Internet Jewish History Sourcebook A very large collection of links.

Patterns of Anti-Jewish Violence in the Wake of the Earliest Ritual Murder Accusations Deborah Jo Miller, Cornell University Paper Delivered April 16, 1994 at the Fordham University Conference on "Violence in the Middle Ages"

Blood Libel, Part 1 Much of this article was drawn, directly or indirectly, from work in progress and from Deborah Jo Miller, The Development of the 'Ritual Murder' Accusation in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries and its Relationship to the Changing Attitudes of Christians towards Jews . M. Phil. thesis, Cambridge 1991.

Blood Libel, Part 2 Blood Libel Redux: from Jo Miller.

The Golem Homepage A part of the fifth dimension project.

The Golem LegendThe story of the Golem begins in the old city of Prague. Many boys and girls do not know where Prague is located. It is the capital of Czechoslovakia,( a country in eastern Europe). Over one million people live there today.

 

Created June 2, 1997 and is continuously revised
SCILS, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey