SNOW WHITE ALTERNATIVE TEXTS

Confirmations and Alternatives to "he told her all that had happened, and how he loved her better than the whole world, and begged her to go with him to his father's palace and be his wife. Snow-White consented, and went with him, and the wedding was celebrated with great splendour and magnificence."

Compiled by: Kay E. Vandergrift

This page provides alternative or confirming translations and interpretations of the above phrase in thirty-six text versions. The various editions used are listed chronologically. For the convenience of the English reader, German editions have not been included although they have been consulted. Since most picture books do not include pagination, I have counted the pages from the beginning picture and/or text to facilitate finding the appropriate passage. The various spellings of particular words that appear in the texts have been retained; these are not misspellings but reflect textual accuracy.

TEXTUAL QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS

  1. Why is the wedding the culmination of this story and of so many other tales?
  2. Is there a special meaning to the word "splendour" used in several texts to describe the wedding?
  3. Note the stress in most versions on Snow White's beauty being the catalyst for the desire of the prince.
  4. Compare Snow White to other traditional characters valued primarily for their beauty. Imagine Snow White at the age of her stepmother or vice versa.
  5. Why does Johnstone have Snow White return to the home of her father?
  6. Does the ending reflect the "deepest wishes of the folk" that Padriac Colum writes about?

Household Stories from the Collection of the Bros. Grimm.
Translated by Lucy Crane. Illus. by Walter Crane. London: Macmillan, 1882, pp. 212--221.

"Oh dear! Where am I?" cried she. The king's son answered, full of joy, "You are near me," and, relating all that had happened, he said,
"I would rather have you than anything in the world; come with me to my father's castle and you shall be my bride." p.221.

"Gold-Tree and Silver-Tree," in Celtic Fairy Tales. Written and Edited by Joseph Jacobs. Illus. by John D. Batten. New York and London: G. P. Putnam's Sons, n.d. [c. 1892] pp. 97-101.

"What gift," said his wife, "would you give me that I could make you laugh?"
"Oh! Indeed, nothing could make me laugh, except Gold-tree were to come alive again."
"Well you'll find her alive down there in the room."
"When the prince saw Gold-tree alive he made great rejoicings, and he began to kiss her, and kiss her, and kiss her. Said the second wife, "Since she is the first one you had it is better for you to stick to her, and I will go away."
"Oh! Indeed you shall not go away, but I shall have you both." p. 100.

Favorite Fairy Tales: The Childhood Choice of Representative Men and Women. Illus. by Peter Newell. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1907, pp. 173-192.

""Oh, heaven!" cried she, "where am I?" The prince answered, joyfully, "Thou art with me," and told her what had happened, saying, "I love thee more dearly than anything else in the world. Come with me to my father's castle, and be my wife." p. 191.

"Gold-Tree and Silver-Tree," in Celtic Fairy Tales. Written and Edited by Joseph Jacobs. Illus. by John D. Batten. New York and London: G. P. Putnam's Sons, n.d. [c. 1892] pp. 97-101.

Not included in this text version.

The Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm. Translated by Mrs. Edgar Lucas. Illus. by Arthur Rackham. London: Constable & Co., 1909, pp.161-170.

"Oh Heaven! Where am I?" she asked.
The Prince, full of joy, said, "You are with me," and he related what had happened, and then said, "I love you better than all the world; come with me to my father's castle and be my wife." p.170.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Illus. by Dinah. London: Raphael Tuck & Sons, [c. 1936] pp. 1-14.

"Then the prince's tender heart filled with compassion as he saw the sunkissed hair, the rose-red lips and the pure white skin of his princess. With love in his heart he knelt and gently kissed her. And that was the very thing, the only thing, that could break the Queen's bad charm!
. . . So, once more, the forest rejoiced and was glad again as Prince Charming lifted Snow White on to his splendid white horse and took her away to be his bride." p. 14.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Freely Translated and Illustrated by Wanda Gag. New York: Coward-McCann, 1938, pp. 9-43.

"The Prince rushed up and lifted her out of the casket. He told her all that had happened and begged her to be his bride. Snow White consented with sparkling eyes, so they rode away to the Prince's home where they prepared for a gay and gala wedding." pp.41-42.

Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Story adapted by Jane Werner. Illus. by the Walt Disney Studio adapted by Campbell Grant. Racine, WI: Golden Press, 1952, pp. 1-20.

"At the touch of Love's First Kiss, Snow White awoke. There, bending over her, was the Prince of her dreams. Snow White knew that she loved him, too. She said good-by to the seven dwarfs and, mounted on a white charger behind her Prince, rode off to his Castle of Dreams Come True." p. 20.

Snow White And Other Stories From Grimm. Retold by Jeanne Cappe. Translated by Marie Ponsot. Illus. by J.L. Huens. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1957, pp. 3-18.

"You are with the Prince who dreamed of you and has looked a long time to find you," said the young man.
"You are here with us who love you so," said the dwarfs, and they all blushed for happiness.
The Prince kneeled to tell Snow White of his love, and to ask her to marry him." p. 16.

"Nourie Hadig," in 100 Armenian Tales and Their Folkloristic Relevance. Collected and Edited by Susie Hoogasian-Villa. Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press, 1966, pp. 84-91.

"Nourie Hadig and the gypsy soon became good friends and decided to share the burden of taking care of the sleeping boy. One day, one would serve him; and the next day, the other would serve him. They continued in this way for three years. One warm summer day the gypsy was fanning the youth when he suddenly awoke. As he thought that the gypsy has served him for the entire seven years, he said to her: "I am a prince, and you are to be my princess for having cared for me such a long time." The gypsy said, "If you say it, so shall it be." p. 87 . . . "Nourie Hadig," the prince said, "it is not my fault that I chose the gypsy for my wife instead of you. I didn't know the whole story. You are to be my wife, and the gypsy will be your servant."
"No, since you are betrothed to her and all the preparations for the wedding are made, you must marry the gypsy," Nourie Hadig said.
"That will not do. You must be my wife and her mistress." So Nourie Hadig and the prince were married. p. 89

"Myrsina, or Myrtle," in Folktales of Greece. Ed. by Georgios A. Megas. Translated by Helen Colaclides. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1970, pp. 106-113.

"And when they had all gone outside, he opened the chest, and what did he see? Myrsina, all dressed in gold and so beautiful that even though lifeless she looked like an angel. Then the Prince was struck with wonder. And when he came to himself and saw the ring Myrsina wore, he said, "Let me see if there is anything written in the ring that will tell me what this unhappy girl's name is."
"And no sooner had he taken it off her finger than Myrsina woke on the instant and leapt out of the chest.
She began to ask, "Where am I? Who brought me here? Why, this isn't my home. Where are you, brothers mine?"
"I'm your brother now, " said the Prince, "and you're in the King's palace."
. . . "Then the Prince was appeased. And when his illness was over, he lost no time in marrying Myrsina, and they lived happily together." pp. 111-112.

The Fairy Tale Treasury. Selected by Virginia Haviland. Illus. by Raymond Briggs. New York: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan, 1972, pp. 128-137.

"Oh dear! Where am I?" cried she. The king's son answered, full of joy, "You are near me," and relating all that had happened, he said,
"I would rather have you than anything in the world: come with me to my father's castle and you shall be my bride." Snow-white liked him and went with him, so their wedding was held with pomp and great splendour." p. 137.

Snow-White and the Seven Dwarfs: A Tale from the Brothers Grimm. Translated by Randall Jarrell. Illus. by Nancy Ekholm Burkert. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1972, pp. 1-26.

"Oh heavens, where am I?" cried she.
The king's son, full of joy, said: "You're with me," and told her what had happened, and said: "I love you more than anything in all the world. Come with me to my father's palace; you shall be my wife." p. 23.

The Juniper Tree and Other Tales from Grimm: Selected by Lore Segal and Maurice Sendak. Translated by Lore Segal with four tales translated by Randall Jarrell. Illus. by Maurice Sendak. 2 Volumes. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1973, pp. 256-274.
[The translation of "Snow-White and the Seven Dwarfs," is that of Randall Jarrell first published in The Golden Bird and Other Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm New York: Macmillan, 1962.]

"Oh, heavens, where am I?" cried she.
The king's son, full of joy, said: "You're with me," and told her what had happened, and said: "I love you more than anything in all the world. Come with me to my father's palace; you shall be my wife." pp. 270, 273.

The Tale of the Dead Princess and the Seven Knights. Alexander Pushkin. Translated by Peter Tempest. Illus. by V. Konashevich. Moscow, USSR: Progress Publishers, 1973.
"And the Prince in tears dissolving
Threw himself upon the coffin. . .
And it broke! The maiden straight
Came to life, sat up, in great
Wonder looked about and yawning
As she set her bed see-sawing
Said with pretty arms outstretched:
"Gracious me! How long I've slept!"
. . . To a wedding people hurried,
For the good Prince Yelisei
Wed his Princess that same day." pp. 32, 36.

Snow White By the Brothers Grimm. Freely Translated from the German by Paul Heins. Illus. by Trina Schart Hyman. Boston, MA: Little Brown, 1974, pp. 1-43.

"Where am I ?" she called out.
The king's son said joyfully, "You are with me," and told her what had happened. "I love you more than anything in the world. Come with me to my father's castle, and you shall be my wife."
Snow White was happy to go with him. Their wedding was arranged with great splendor and magnificence. . ." pp. 40-41.

The Classic Fairy Tales. Iona Opie and Peter Opie. London: Oxford University Press, 1974, pp. 175-182.

". . .and Snow-drop awoke, and said "Where am I?" And the prince answered, "Thou art safe with me." Then he told her all that had happened, and said, "I love you better than all the world: come to my father's palace, and you shall be my wife." p.182.

Grimms' Tales for Young and Old: The Complete Stories. Translated by Ralph Manheim. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1977, pp. 184-191. [Translated from the Winkler-Verlag (Munich) edition of the Complete Kinder- und Hausmaerchen (Tales for Young and Old) by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, as first published in 1819.]

""Oh!" she cried. "Where am I?" "With me!" the prince answered joyfully. Then he told her what had happened and said: "I love you more than anything in the world; come with me to my father's castle and be my wife." Snow White loved him and went with him, and arrangements were made for a splendid wedding feast. p. 190.

"Bella Venezia" [Abruzzo] in Italian Folktales. Selected and Retold by Italo Calvino. Translated by George Martin. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1980, pp. 395-398.

"If you were alive, I would marry you," he said. "Even though you are dead, I can't tear myself away from you."
. . . "Dead or not, I can't live apart from her!"
"You can at least have her hair fixed!" said the queen, and sent for the royal hairdresser. He came and, combing her hair, broke his comb. He picked up another comb and broke that one too. Thus, one right after the other, he broke seven combs. "What on earth does this girl have in her head?" asked the royal hairdresser. "I shall take a look." And he touched the head of a pin. He pulled ever so gently and, as the pin came out, the maiden regained her color, opened her eyes, drew her breath, said, "Oh," and stood up.
The wedding was celebrated." p. 398.

"Giricoccola," [Bologna] in Italian Folktales. Selected and Retold by Italo Calvino. Translated by George Martin. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1980, pp. 154-156.

"No sooner was it off than Giricoccola stirred and came back to life. The sisters almost died of fright, but Giricoccola reassured them with her story. Then they had her hide behind a door to await their brother's return. The king's son was frantic upon discovering the statue missing, but out jumped Giricoccola and told him everything from beginning to end. The youth took her to his parents at once and introduced her as his bride. The wedding was celebrated immediately. p. 156.

Best-Loved Folktales of the World. Selected by Joanna Cole. Illus. by Jill Karla Schwarz. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1982, pp. 53-61.

"Oh dear! Where am I?" cried she. The King's son answered, full of joy, "You are near me," and, relating all that had happened, he said:
"I would rather have you than anything in the world; come with me to my father's castle and you shall be my bride."
And Snow-White was kind, and went with him, and their wedding was held with pomp and great splendor." p. 60.

Favorite Tales from Grimm. Text retold by Nancy Garden. Illus. by Mercer Mayer. New York: Four Winds Press, 1982, pp. 5-19.

"Where am I?" she asked, lifting the lid of the coffin and looking around.
"You are in the forest with me," said the prince joyfully, and told her who he was.
"And with us," said the dwarfs, who had stayed to see her safely away. "Oh, dearest Snow White!" And they helped lift her out of the coffin and stand her upon her feet, and they all hugged her and danced around her for joy.
"Snow White," said the prince, when the rejoicing had subsided, "I fell in love with your beauty when I saw you lying in the coffin; then I fell in love with your kindness when the dwarfs told me of it; and now, seeing you alive, I have fallen in love with you yourself. Will you come with me to my father's palace and be my wife?" p. 18.

Snow White. Adapted from the Fairy Tales by the Brothers Grimm. Illus. by Bernadette Watts. Winchester, MA: Nord-Sud/Faber & Faber, 1983. Pp. 1-25.

"A moment later Snow White opened her eyes, lifted the lid of the coffin, sat up and cried, "Where am I?"
The Prince replied joyfully, "You are with me!" He told her what had happened and said, "I love you more than all the world. Come with me to my father's castle and be my bride."
Snow White went with him and their wedding was celebrated with great pomp and splendour. p. 23.

My Pop-Up Book of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Illus. by Anne Grahame Johnstone. London: Deans International, 1983, pp. 1-10.

"She sat up and blinked. "Where am I?" she asked.
The dwarf explained. Shortly afterwards they heard that Snow White's wicked stepmother had been banished from the kingdom when the King discovered what had happened.
"Now I can go back to my father's palace," cried Snow White. "Will you take me there?" she asked the prince.
The King was overjoyed to see her after such a long time and when the prince asked him for his daughter's hand in marriage he was only to pleased to agree." pp. 9-10.

The Brothers Grimm Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Translated and adapted by Anthea Bell. Illus. by Chihiro Iwasaki. New York: Picture Book Studio, USA., 1984, pp 1-38.

"Where am I?" she asked.
"With me," said the king's son joyfully, and he told her what had happened. "I love you more than all the world," he said. "Come home to my father's castle, and you will be my wife."
So Snow White agreed to marry him, and their wedding was celebrated with great magnificence. pp. 36-37.

Snow White in New York. Fiona French. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press, 1986, pp. 1-30.

"The first person she saw was the reporter. He smiled at her and she smiled back
. . . Snow White and the reporter fell in love. They had a big society wedding, and the next day cruised off on a glorious honeymoon together." pp.27-28.

Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Based on Walt Disney's full-length animated classic. Adapted by Suzanne Weyn. New York: Scholastic, 1987. [original copyright 1937] paperback, pp. 1-73.

"The prince knelt by her side and gently kissed Snow White. . . .
Then, very, very slowly at first, Snow White began to move. Love's first kiss had overcome the sleeping death!
The prince and the dwarfs watched, awestruck, as Snow White sat up and looked around.
When Snow White saw the prince, she reached out to him. He quickly swept Snow White up in his arms." p.73.

The Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm: Volume I. Tales I-100. Translated by Jack Zipes. Illus. by John B. Gruelle. New York: Bantam, 1987, pp.213-222. [The present translation is based in part on the first of the Kinder und Hausmaerchen published in two volumes in 1812 and 1815. The first 211 tales in this translation are based on the seventh and final edition published in 1857. Illustrations by John B. Gruelle first appeared in Grimm's Fairy Tales, translated by Margaret Hunt in 1914.]

"Oh, Lord! Where am I?" she exclaimed.
The prince rejoiced and said, "You're with me," and he told her what had happened. Then he added, "I love you more than anything else in the world. Come with me to my father's castle. I want you to be my wife." p.220.

The Child's Fairy Tale Book. Illus. by Kay Chorao. New York: Dutton, 1990, pp. 6-19.

"The Prince, overjoyed, told Snow White what had happened. Then he begged her to come with him and be his wife, and Snow White gladly accepted.
So a magnificent wedding was planned." p.18.

Snow White. Retold by Josephine Poole. Illus. by Angela Barrett. New York: Knopf, 1991, pp. 1-30.

"She stirred, opened her eyes, and astonished at finding herself in a glass box, raised the lid and sat up, alive and well. Then the prince and the dwarfs were overcome with joy at the miracle, and the prince, falling at once to his knees, begged the beautiful girl to be his bride. He took her to his father's castle, and the seven dwarfs he made his counselors. A splendid feast was arranged. . . " pp. 27, 29.

Snow White by the Brothers Grimm. Retold by Jennifer Greenway. Illus. by Erin Augenstine. Kansas City, MS: Ariel Books, 1991.

"Snow White opened her eyes. "Where am I?" she cried, looking up at the prince.
"You are with me," he replied, "and I wish you to marry me and stay with me forever." p. 29.

Favorite Fairy Tales. Compiled by Cooper Edens and Harold Darling. San Francisco, CA: Blue Lantern Studio/Chronicle Books, 1991, pp. 30-37.

"Where am I?" she asked,
The Prince answered joyfully, saying "From the moment I saw you, I have loved you.
Will you come with me to my father's castle and be my wife?" p.36.

Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Adapted from the Film by Jim Razzi. Illus. by Fernando Guell and Fred Martin. New York: Disney Press, 1993.

"Snow White slowly sat up and smiled. It was as if she had just woken up from a good night's sleep. When she saw the prince, her eyes lit up in surprise, and she held out her arms to him. The prince quickly took her in his arms and lifted her up." p. 92.

The Rainbow Fairy Book: Classic Fairy Tales. Ed. by Andrew Lang. Illus. by Michael Hague. New York: Books of Wonder/Morrow, 1993, pp. 207-221.

"Oh! Dear me, where am I?" she cried.
The Prince answered joyfully, "You are with me," and he told her all that had happened, adding, "I love you better than anyone in all the whole wide world. Will you come with me to my father's palace and be my wife?"
Snowdrop consented, and went with him, and the marriage was celebrated with great pomp and splendor." p. 220.

Politically Correct Bedtime Stories: Modern Tales for Our Life & Times. James Finn Garner. New York: Macmillan, 1994, pp. 43-56.

"The prince stayed on at the spa as a cute but harmless tennis pro. And Snow White and the queen became good friends and earned world-wide fame for their contributions to sisterhood." p. 56.

Rimonah of the Flashing Sword: A North African Tale. Adapted by Eric A. Kimmel. Illus. by Omar Rayyan. New York: Holiday House, 1995.

"Rimonah spoke. She sat up in her coffin like one awakened from the dead. "I was alive, but in a deep slumber," she told her astonished companions. "My mother watched over me. And while I slept, I dreamed of this prince. Only he had the power to awaken me from my enchantment, but only if his love was as strong as the spell that bound me."
"Heaven has blessed us both," the prince said. "Princess, it is I who am under your spell. Let us be married. All that I possess is yours." p. 22.

Snow White: A Tale from the Brothers Grimm. Illus. by Charles Santore. New York: Park Lane Press, 1996, pp. 1-44.

". . . and she instantly awoke, and asked, "Where am I? Who are you? The prince just smiled with joy. Then he told her all that had happened, and said, "I promise to love you better than all the world. Come with me to my father's palace, and you shall be my wife." Snow White consented, and went home with the prince; and everything was prepared with great pomp and splendor for their wedding." p. 44.
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Created January 6, 1997 and is continuously revised