SNOW WHITE ALTERNATIVE TEXTS

Confirmations and Alternatives to the phrase "Then a pair of red-hot iron shoes was brought into the room with tongs and set before her, and these she was forced to put on and to dance in them until she could dance no longer, but fell down dead . . ."

Compiled by: Kay E. Vandergrift

This page provides alternative or confirming translations and interpretations of the above phrase in thirty-six text versions. The various editions used are listed chronologically. For the convenience of the English reader, German editions have not been included although they have been consulted. Since most picture books do not include pagination, I have counted the pages from the beginning picture and/or text to facilitate finding the appropriate passage. The various spellings of particular words that appear in the texts have been retained; these are not misspellings but reflect textual accuracy.

TEXTUAL QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS

  1. Why is it "iron shoes" that kills the Queen?
  2. Why do many versions exclude the iron shoes?
  3. Is there a connection among dancing and shoes and punishment?
  4. What alternative endings for the queen are used? Why?
  5. Why does Disney choose to have nature and the dwarfs cause her death?

Household Stories from the Collection of the Bros. Grimm.
Translated by Lucy Crane. Illus. by Walter Crane. London: Macmillan, 1882, pp. 212--221.

"And when she saw her she knew her for Snow-white, and could not stir from the place for anger and terror. For they had ready red-hot iron shoes, in which she had to dance until she fell down dead." p. 221.

"Gold-Tree and Silver-Tree," in Celtic Fairy Tales. Written and Edited by Joseph Jacobs. Illus. by John D. Batten. New York and London: G. P. Putnam's Sons, n.d. [c. 1892] pp. 97-101.

"It is the custom in this country," said the second wife, "that the person who offers a drink takes a draught out of it first."
"Silver-tree put her mouth to it, and the second wife went and struck it so that some of it went down her throat, and she fell dead. They had only to carry her home a dead corpse and bury her." p.101.

Favorite Fairy Tales: The Childhood Choice of Representative Men and Women. Illus. by Peter Newell. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1907, pp. 173-192.

"When she came, and found that it was Snowdrop alive again, she stood petrified with terror and despair. Then two iron shoes, heated burning hot, were drawn out of the fire with a pair of tongs, and laid before her feet. She was forced to put them on, and to go and dance at Snowdrop's wedding-dancing, dancing on these read hot shoes till she fell down dead." p. 192.

The Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm. Translated by Mrs. Edgar Lucas. Illus. by Arthur Rackham. London: Constable & Co., 1909, pp.161-170.

"But iron slippers were heated over the fire, and were soon brought in with tongs and put before her. And she had to step into the red-hot shoes and dance till she fell down dead." p. 170.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Illus. by Dinah. London: Raphael Tuck & Sons, [c. 1936] pp. 1-14.

Not included in this text version.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Freely Translated and Illustrated by Wanda Gag. New York: Coward-McCann, 1938, pp. 9-43.

"It would have been better for her if she had, for when she arrived she was given a pair of red hot shoes with which she had to dance out her wicked life." p. 43.

Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Story adapted by Jane Werner. Illus. by the Walt Disney Studio adapted by Campbell Grant. Racine, WI: Golden Press, 1952, pp. 1-20.

"They [the dwarfs] chased her through the gloomy woods until she plunged into a bottomless gulf and disappeared forever." p. 19.

Snow White And Other Stories From Grimm. Retold by Jeanne Cappe. Translated by Marie Ponsot. Illus. by J.L. Huens. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1957, pp. 3-18.

"When she mounted the stairs and recognized Snow White, she dropped dead of fury." p. 17.

"Nourie Hadig," in 100 Armenian Tales and Their Folkloristic Relevance. Collected and Edited by Susie Hoogasian-Villa. Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press, 1966, pp. 84-91.

"The mother was so surprised and so angry that her daughter was alive that she died of rage there and then." p. 91.

"Myrsina, or Myrtle," in Folktales of Greece. Ed. by Georgios A. Megas. Translated by Helen Colaclides. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1970, pp. 106-113.

"Quickly, seize those women and get rid of them as best you know how. For they have come here to poison Queen Myrsina."
"Then they seized the two sisters and what they did with them I don't know. I only know that they were never seen or heard of again." p.112..

The Fairy Tale Treasury. Selected by Virginia Haviland. Illus. by Raymond Briggs. New York: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan, 1972, pp. 128-137.

"And when she saw her she knew her for Snow-white, and could not stir from the place for anger and terror. For they had ready red-hot iron shoes, in which she had to dance until she fell down dead." p. 137.

Snow-White and the Seven Dwarfs: A Tale from the Brothers Grimm. Translated by Randall Jarrell. Illus. by Nancy Ekholm Burkert. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1972, pp. 1-26.

"But they had already put iron slippers over a fire of coals, and they brought them in with tongs and set them before her. Then she had to put on the red-hot slippers and dance till she dropped down dead." p. 24.

The Juniper Tree and Other Tales from Grimm: Selected by Lore Segal and Maurice Sendak. Translated by Lore Segal with four tales translated by Randall Jarrell. Illus. by Maurice Sendak. 2 Volumes. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1973, pp. 256-274.
[The translation of "Snow-White and the Seven Dwarfs," is that of Randall Jarrell first published in The Golden Bird and Other Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm New York: Macmillan, 1962.]

"But they had already put iron slippers over a fire of coals, and they brought them in with tongs and set them before her. Then she had to put on the red-hot slippers and dance till she dropped down dead." p. 274.

The Tale of the Dead Princess and the Seven Knights. Alexander Pushkin. Translated by Peter Tempest. Illus. by V. Konashevich. Moscow, USSR: Progress Publishers, 1973.
"Overcome by grief and spite, The Tsaritsa died that night." p.36.

Snow White By the Brothers Grimm. Freely Translated from the German by Paul Heins. Illus. by Trina Schart Hyman. Boston, MA: Little Brown, 1974, pp. 1-43.

"But iron slippers had already been placed on a coal fire and were brought with tongs and placed before her. She had to step into the red hot shoes and dance until she fell down dead." p. 43.

The Classic Fairy Tales. Iona Opie and Peter Opie. London: Oxford University Press, 1974, pp. 175-182.

"And when she arrived, and saw that it was no other than Snow-drop, who, as she thought, had been dead a long while, she choked with passion, and fell ill and died; but Snow-drop and the prince lived and reigned happily over that land many many years." p.182.

Grimms' Tales for Young and Old: The Complete Stories. Translated by Ralph Manheim. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1977, pp. 184-191. [Translated from the Winkler-Verlag (Munich) edition of the Complete Kinder- und HausMaerchen (Tales for Young and Old) by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, as first published in 1819.]

"But two iron slippers had already been put into glowing coals. Someone took them out with a pair of tongs and set them down in front of her. She was forced to step into the red-hot shoes and dance till she fell to the floor dead." p.191.

"Bella Venezia" [Abruzzo] in Italian Folktales. Selected and Retold by Italo Calvino. Translated by George Martin. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1980, pp. 395-398.

Not included in this text version.

"Giricoccola," [Bologna] in Italian Folktales. Selected and Retold by Italo Calvino. Translated by George Martin. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1980, pp. 154-156.

"Giricoccola's sisters learned of this from the astrologer and died of rage right then and there." p. 156.

Best-Loved Folktales of the World. Selected by Joanna Cole. Illus. by Jill Karla Schwarz. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1982, pp. 53-61.

"For they had ready red-hot iron shoes, in which she had to dance until she fell down dead." p. 61.

Favorite Tales from Grimm. Text retold by Nancy Garden. Illus. by Mercer Mayer. New York: Four Winds Press, 1982, pp. 5-19.

"And at this the wicked queen was so angry she ripped the mirror from the wall and threw it across her room, shattering it into a thousand pieces. One of the pieces hit against the ebony window frame, and flew back and pierced the wicked queen's heart, and she fell down dead, never to harm Snow White or anyone else again." p.19.

Snow White. Adapted from the Fairy Tales by the Brothers Grimm. Illus. by Bernadette Watts. Winchester, MA: Nord-Sud/Faber & Faber, 1983. Pp. 1-25.

"When she recognised Snow White her heart stood still with rage and she fell down dead." p. 25.

My Pop-Up Book of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Illus. by Anne Grahame Johnstone. London: Deans International, 1983, pp. 1-10.

". . . Snow White's wicked stepmother had been banished from the kingdom when the King discovered what had happened." p. 9.

The Brothers Grimm Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Translated and adapted by Anthea Bell. Illus. by Chihiro Iwasaki. New York: Picture Book Studio, USA., 1984, pp 1-38.

". . . and when she set eyes on her and recognized Snow White, she was so angry that she fell down dead." p. 37.

Snow White in New York. Fiona French. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press, 1986, pp. 1-30.

Not included in this text version.

Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Based on Walt Disney's full-length animated classic. Adapted by Suzanne Weyn. New York: Scholastic, 1987. [original copyright 1937] paperback, pp. 1-73.

Not included in this text version.

The Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm: Volume I. Tales I-100. Translated by Jack Zipes. Illus. by John B. Gruelle. New York: Bantam, 1987, pp.213-222. [The present translation is based in part on the first of the Kinder und Hausmaerchen published in two volumes in 1812 and 1815. The first 211 tales in this translation are based on the seventh and final edition published in 1857. Illustrations by John B. Gruelle first appeared in Grimm's Fairy Tales, translated by Margaret Hunt in 1914.]

"The evil queen was so petrified with fright that she could not budge. Iron slippers has already been heated over a fire, and they were brought over to her with tongs. Finally, she had to put on the red-hot slippers and dance until she fell down dead. p.222.

The Child's Fairy Tale Book. Illus. by Kay Chorao. New York: Dutton, 1990, pp. 6-19.

"When she stepped into the great hall and recognized Snow White, her rage was so great and so violent that she had to be taken away. She died soon after." p. 18.

Snow White. Retold by Josephine Poole. Illus. by Angela Barrett. New York: Knopf, 1991, pp. 1-30.

"But she took with her a poisonous rose, which she meant to leave on the young bride's pillow. When she saw that it was Snow White who was married, so happy and so beloved, the evil queen turned quite mad with jealousy, so that in her passion she clutched the deadly rose. Then she died miserably of her own poison." p. 29.

Snow White by the Brothers Grimm. Retold by Jennifer Greenway. Illus. by Erin Augenstine. Kansas City, MS: Ariel Books, 1991.

"As for the wicked queen, she was so angry that she ran into the forest and was never seen again." p.32.

Favorite Fairy Tales. Compiled by Cooper Edens and Harold Darling. San Francisco, CA: Blue Lantern Studio/Chronicle Books, 1991, pp. 30-37.

"When she arrived at the castle and found that it was Snowdrop, she stood petrified with terror. Then two iron shoes were laid before her, and she was forced to put them on and to dance at Snowdrop's wedding-dancing and dancing in those heavy shoes until she fell down dead. And that was the end of her." p. 37.

Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Adapted from the Film by Jim Razzi. Illus. by Fernando Guell and Fred Martin. New York: Disney Press, 1993.

"Look out!" cried Grumpy. "She's going to roll that boulder right over us!" The witch laughed triumphantly as the boulder started to come loose. But just as it was about to roll down unto the dwarfs, a bolt of lightning struck the outcropping rock. In an instant, it shattered and fell away, carrying the witch and the boulder with it. The witch gave out a long, horrifying shriek as she fell all the way to the jagged rocks below." p. 88.

The Rainbow Fairy Book: Classic Fairy Tales. Ed. by Andrew Lang. Illus. by Michael Hague. New York: Books of Wonder/Morrow, 1993, pp. 207-221.

"As she entered Snowdrop recognized her, and nearly fainted with fear; but red-hot iron shoes had been prepared for the wicked old Queen, and she was made to get into them and dance till she fell down dead." p. 221.

Politically Correct Bedtime Stories: Modern Tales for Our Life & Times. James Finn Garner. New York: Macmillan, 1994, pp. 43-56.

"While we were immobile and you all blathered on in your sexist way, I had a personal awakening. From now on, I am going to dedicate my life to healing the rift between womyn's souls and their bodies. I am going to teach womyn to accept their natural body images and become whole again. Snow White and I are going to build a womyn's spa and conference center on this very spot. . ." p.56.

Rimonah of the Flashing Sword: A North African Tale. Adapted by Eric A. Kimmel. Illus. by Omar Rayyan. New York: Holiday House, 1995.

"But the magic bowl had already warned the sorceress that her end was near. She mounted her flying carpet and swooped out the window, screeching defiance to those below. However, in her haste she left the porcelain bowl behind.
Rimonah dashed up the tower stairs. She seized the bowl and hurled it after the flying carpet. The bowl plummeted to the ground, shattering to pieces. At that instant the queen's carpet flew apart. Bits of colored silk rained from the sky as the sorceress-queen plunged to her doom." p. 26-28.

Snow White: A Tale from the Brothers Grimm. Illus. by Charles Santore. New York: Park Lane Press, 1996, pp. 1-44.

"Then the wicked queen was commanded to put on a pair of magic slippers. The minute they were on her feet, the slippers forced her to dance and dance, faster and faster, until she dropped down dead." p. 44.

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Created January 6, 1997 and is continuously revised